The Rundown | Second Semester of Medical School

After posting about what I loved and learned during my first year of medical school, I realized that some of you might want to know how I studied during the second semester (when my school starts focusing on and going in depth with the specific systems of the body). Keep reading. I hope this helps someone out there.

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Neuro/Psych 
This nine week obstacle was the hardest class that I have ever taken. In medical school. Or anywhere else. Neurology, as we know, focuses on the brain and nerves and how those connections help us live our lives. And boy, are there lots of connections. The memorization was the hardest part for me because I am a “big picture” kind of girl and details are my worst enemy. I, of course, used the PowerPoints provided by my professors (I did this for every course) but found Dr. Najeeb’s videos to be a live saver. Some medical students swear by him and when it comes to Neuro, I definitely do. He saved me by the hair of my chinny chin chin with his in depth explanations, drawings, and sense of humor. I would check him out. The Psychiatry portion of the course was definitely more enjoyable and easier for me. The trickiest part was remembering all of those drugs, and for that, I used KissPharm.

MSK
It was in the Musculoskeletal system block that I began writing hand written notes and saw that my test scores were improving. We had the most awkward scheduling for this block with a mix of OSCEs and Spring Break. It got kind of crazy. MSK, however, was very straight forward and I rarely used outside information for this course. What we learned reemphasized a lot of our Anatomy and OMT training so, on a whole, my class did very well. Pharm is always going to be a hurdle for me, so again, I used KissPharm.

Heme/Lymph
A little background on me. I love blood. I love hematology. I’ve conducted heme research before so I was very excited for this block. Heme/Lymph. Hematology. Oncology. Lymphatics. Blood. Pathoma videos came in clutch during this block because sometimes your brain gets a little tired towards the end of the semester and you can’t seem to focus in lecture. Listening to a 5-10 minute video before or after class really saves you a lot of heart ache. They cover the leukemias and anemias and everything in between. It was also during this block that the medical school gods bestowed upon us SketchyPharm. Everyone knows of the miracle that is SketchyMicro and how it breaks down the gigantic facts about the microbes around us. SketchyPharm uses the same tactics of cartoons and humor to make sure that you never forget (and I never will) what Heparin does.

Dermatology
This was supposed to be the easy block. Two weeks. Two tests. But wait. So much pathology. So much pharm and micro. As you may have guessed, I used a lot (did you catch that? A LOT) of SketchyMicro and SketchyPharm during this block. It was literally the last two weeks of school and I was reaching the point of burn out. What I will say, though, is that amidst my unquenchable desire for sleep, I fell in love with dermatology and am considering it as a specialty.

Along with these courses, I also studied for OMT and Primary Clinical Skills but never really used outside resources for them. Our professors are amazing and provide more than enough information for success in the classroom and beyond.

I know that I might have to change my study habits as I look forward to Cardiology in the Fall but I am glad that I’ve gotten a good base. Every system requires a bit of adjustment. Jack be nimble. Jack be quick. Jack’s in med-school. Jack learns quick. Keep that in mind, no matter what level you’re at.

Thanks for reading lovelies. I’ll see you real soon! Also let me know if you’d like me to do this after every semester. XX!

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I read and write and want to be a doctor.

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